Digital print technology for a circular economy

This white paper has been published by Fujifilm as part of its commitment to deliver technically advanced and sustainable printing solutions for the print industry

Read the white paper

Reading time: 2 minutes

Where does print fit in the circular economy?

From books, newspapers, magazines and brochures to folders, annual reports and packaging, print remains a vital and highly effective branding, marketing and communications tool. But in an age of heightened environmental concern and ‘net zero’ carbon reduction targets, how can print be used in the most efficient and responsible way? In this white paper, we take a look at how the latest digital printing technology is dramatically cutting waste and making recycling much easier.

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We must do more

As part of the “European Green Deal” project, there is an action plan for the EU to boost the efficient use of resources by moving to a clean, circular economy, restore biodiversity and cut pollution, and be climate neutral by 20501. To achieve this goal, action must be taken at all levels. Switching to renewable energy will, on its own, reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by only 55%. The remaining 45% of emissions come from the way we make and use products, which means working smarter and wasting less.

Fujifilm is committed to fully integrating print into the circular economy. Net zero doesn’t have to mean online only – print will always have a vital role to play, and we’re committed to making sure it can always play that role efficiently, effectively and sustainably.

The way we print is changing

The graphics industry has many analogue techniques which, especially when used for bespoke or short run work, have an enormous impact on the environment.

Now, thanks to the latest developments in digital print technology, there are machines which can print while also:

• Massively reducing raw material use
• Using fewer and more sustainable consumables
• Needing far fewer parts replacing
• Producing less waste
• Consuming less water
• Producing 100% recyclable printed products

This technology is moving print from the linear to the circular economy in which everyone has a role to play in keeping our planet liveable and our prosperity intact.

Digital print technology for a circular economy

This white paper has been published by Fujifilm as part of its commitment to deliver technically advanced and sustainable printing solutions for the print industry

Read the white paper

Reading time: 2 minutes

Where does print fit in the circular economy?

From books, newspapers, magazines and brochures to folders, annual reports and packaging, print remains a vital and highly effective branding, marketing and communications tool. But in an age of heightened environmental concern and ‘net zero’ carbon reduction targets, how can print be used in the most efficient and responsible way? In this white paper, we take a look at how the latest digital printing technology is dramatically cutting waste and making recycling much easier.

  • Six colour stations with before – and after – CMYK capabilities that allow for a wider range of inline creative options than some competitors
  • Outstanding halftone image reproduction with the largest CMYK colour gamut tested to date and a range of speciality colours that help create a broad colour palette
  • Customisable and intuitive print server platform, which enables efficient device/remote management capabilities
  • Outstanding mixed-media workflow performance, with no productivity slowdown, which translates to more work being handled inline in a single job submission

We must do more

As part of the “European Green Deal” project, there is an action plan for the EU to boost the efficient use of resources by moving to a clean, circular economy, restore biodiversity and cut pollution, and be climate neutral by 20501. To achieve this goal, action must be taken at all levels. Switching to renewable energy will, on its own, reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by only 55%. The remaining 45% of emissions come from the way we make and use products, which means working smarter and wasting less.

The way we print is changing

The graphics industry has many analogue techniques which, especially when used for bespoke or short run work, have an enormous impact on the environment.

Now, thanks to the latest developments in digital print technology, there are machines which can print while also:

• Massively reducing raw material use
• Using fewer and more sustainable consumables
• Needing far fewer parts replacing
• Producing less waste
• Consuming less water
• Producing 100% recyclable printed products

This technology is moving print from the linear to the circular economy in which everyone has a role to play in keeping our planet liveable and our prosperity intact.

About Keypoint Intelligence

Keypoint Intelligence is recognised as the industry’s most trusted resource for unbiased information and analysis, and its awards are highly respected due to its impartiality and decades of experience in digital printing.

 

Discover more

Download the summary report about why the Revoria PC1120 won the award here..

Download award summary

Digital print technology for a circular economy

This white paper has been published by Fujifilm as part of its commitment to deliver technically advanced and sustainable printing solutions for the print industry

Read the white paper

Reading time: 2 minutes

Where does print fit in the circular economy?

From books, newspapers, magazines and brochures to folders, annual reports and packaging, print remains a vital and highly effective branding, marketing and communications tool. But in an age of heightened environmental concern and ‘net zero’ carbon reduction targets, how can print be used in the most efficient and responsible way? In this white paper, we take a look at how the latest digital printing technology is dramatically cutting waste and making recycling much easier.

We must do more

As part of the “European Green Deal” project, there is an action plan for the EU to boost the efficient use of resources by moving to a clean, circular economy, restore biodiversity and cut pollution, and be climate neutral by 20501. To achieve this goal, action must be taken at all levels. Switching to renewable energy will, on its own, reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by only 55%. The remaining 45% of emissions come from the way we make and use products, which means working smarter and wasting less.

This certification program sets certain priorities to the certification criteria according to the product category and the use and features of each product through its entire life cycle. Fujifilm then clarifies the environmental value of each product by conducting environmentally conscious design assessments based on such certification criteria at the time of product development. Certain products are then selected for certification based on the total score of each assessment item. These products are reviewed and approved by the Group Certification Council, and finally certified as a Fujifilm “Green Value Product”.

The way we print is changing

The graphics industry has many analogue techniques which, especially when used for bespoke or short run work, have an enormous impact on the environment.

Now, thanks to the latest developments in digital print technology, there are machines which can print while also:

• Massively reducing raw material use
• Using fewer and more sustainable consumables
• Needing far fewer parts replacing
• Producing less waste
• Consuming less water
• Producing 100% recyclable printed products

This technology is moving print from the linear to the circular economy in which everyone has a role to play in keeping our planet liveable and our prosperity intact.

About Keypoint Intelligence

Keypoint Intelligence is recognised as the industry’s most trusted resource for unbiased information and analysis, and its awards are highly respected due to its impartiality and decades of experience in digital printing.

 

RankCertification criteria
DiamondProducts and services that user their respective industries’ innovative technologies to substantially contribute to reducing environmental impact
GoldProducts and services that reduce environmental impact at their respective industries’ highest level
SilverProducts and services that reduce environmental impact at a higher level than their respective industries’ standard

Product examples

In Fujifilm’s Graphic Arts business, the following products have been certified for their environmental performance:

Jet Press 750S High Speed Model:  GOLD

Effects on reduction of environmental impact:

  • Many of the consumables associated with conventional offset printing are eliminated
  • Significantly reduces the amount of wasted paper
  • Smaller footprint compared to previous models
  • The efficient drying mechanism reduces drying times, contributing to significantly higher speeds, and saving power
  • Excellent paper recycleability (de-inking ability)

Overall, there are significant reductions in resources, water use and waste compared to equivalent offset presses, with excellent paper recycling.

Revoria Press PC1120:                      SILVER

The requirements of major environment labels for energy consumption, hazardous substances, audible sound levels during operation and recyclable design are satisfied.

Revoria E1 Series:                             SILVER

The requirements of major environment labels for energy consumption, hazardous substances, audible sound levels during operation and recyclable design are satisfied.

Digital print technology for a circular economy

This white paper has been published by Fujifilm as part of its commitment to deliver technically advanced and sustainable printing solutions for the print industry

Read the white paper

Reading time: 2 minutes

Fujifilm’s Sustainable Value Plan 2030 (SVP2030)

The Fujifilm Group announced its Sustainable Value Plan 2030 (SVP2030) in August 2017. The new plan set targeting FY2030 as its long-term goal, which is expected to lay the foundations of the Group’s business management strategies for sustainable growth. One of the key pillars of the SVP2030 is dedicated to the environment.

Where does print fit in the circular economy?

From books, newspapers, magazines and brochures to folders, annual reports and packaging, print remains a vital and highly effective branding, marketing and communications tool. But in an age of heightened environmental concern and ‘net zero’ carbon reduction targets, how can print be used in the most efficient and responsible way? In this white paper, we take a look at how the latest digital printing technology is dramatically cutting waste and making recycling much easier.

We must do more

As part of the “European Green Deal” project, there is an action plan for the EU to boost the efficient use of resources by moving to a clean, circular economy, restore biodiversity and cut pollution, and be climate neutral by 20501. To achieve this goal, action must be taken at all levels. Switching to renewable energy will, on its own, reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by only 55%. The remaining 45% of emissions come from the way we make and use products, which means working smarter and wasting less.

This certification program sets certain priorities to the certification criteria according to the product category and the use and features of each product through its entire life cycle. Fujifilm then clarifies the environmental value of each product by conducting environmentally conscious design assessments based on such certification criteria at the time of product development. Certain products are then selected for certification based on the total score of each assessment item. These products are reviewed and approved by the Group Certification Council, and finally certified as a Fujifilm “Green Value Product”.

The way we print is changing

The graphics industry has many analogue techniques which, especially when used for bespoke or short run work, have an enormous impact on the environment.

Now, thanks to the latest developments in digital print technology, there are machines which can print while also:

• Massively reducing raw material use
• Using fewer and more sustainable consumables
• Needing far fewer parts replacing
• Producing less waste
• Consuming less water
• Producing 100% recyclable printed products

This technology is moving print from the linear to the circular economy in which everyone has a role to play in keeping our planet liveable and our prosperity intact.

About Keypoint Intelligence

Keypoint Intelligence is recognised as the industry’s most trusted resource for unbiased information and analysis, and its awards are highly respected due to its impartiality and decades of experience in digital printing.

 

Fujifilm has recently increased its target for contributing to reducing CO2 emissions generated in society from 50 million tonnes to 90 million tonnes.  The aim is to achieve this by replacing conventional products with products that are more sustainable.

So far (2020) the progress is 20 million tonnes, 23% of the way towards the target

Product examples

In Fujifilm’s Graphic Arts business, the following products have been certified for their environmental performance:

Jet Press 750S High Speed Model:  GOLD

Effects on reduction of environmental impact:

  • Many of the consumables associated with conventional offset printing are eliminated
  • Significantly reduces the amount of wasted paper
  • Smaller footprint compared to previous models
  • The efficient drying mechanism reduces drying times, contributing to significantly higher speeds, and saving power
  • Excellent paper recycleability (de-inking ability)

Overall, there are significant reductions in resources, water use and waste compared to equivalent offset presses, with excellent paper recycling.

Revoria Press PC1120:                      SILVER

The requirements of major environment labels for energy consumption, hazardous substances, audible sound levels during operation and recyclable design are satisfied.

Revoria E1 Series:                             SILVER

The requirements of major environment labels for energy consumption, hazardous substances, audible sound levels during operation and recyclable design are satisfied.

Promote the recycling of resources

Reduce the amount of water the Fujifilm Group uses by 30% by FY2030 (compared to FY2013 levels)

The result in FY2020 was 16%, so the company is over half-way towards the goal of 30% by FY2030.

Contribute to the treatment of 35 million tonnes of water per year in society by FY2030

The result in FY2020 was 8 million tonnes, so the company is around 23% of the way towards the goal of 35 million tonnes by FY2030.

Reduce the amount of waste produced by the Fujifilm Group by 30% by FY2030 (compared to FY2013 levels)

Fujifilm has managed to ensure that the amount of waste produced by the Group did not increase in FY2020, despite rising revenues and an expansion of the business, but has not yet managed to make the reductions planned.  This is a key area of focus for the future.

Achieve a recycling index*3 of more than 10 by FY2030 (was 6.5 in FY2020)

Achieve a valuables conversion index*4 of more than 1 in FY2030 (was 0.63 in FY2020)

*3 Recycling index = (Recycled volume + Valuable-converted volume) / Simple disposal volume

*4 Valuables conversion index = Valuable-converted volume / Recycled volume

Address energy issues towards a decarbonised society

By contributing to the creation and widespread use of renewable energies through advanced materials, Fujifilm aims to help address energy issues and the move towards a decarbonised society. In particular, a New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organisation (NEDO) started the development of an “all solid state lithium-ion battery” – a next generation storage battery for electric vehicles, under an industry-government-academia collaboration. Fujifilm is participating in the project as one of 23 manufacturers of cars and batteries.

Ensure product and chemical safety

Under this objective, Fujifilm’s aim is to minimise the adverse effect of chemical substances on human health and the environment. In particular, Fujifilm completed the replacement of 2 of 7 chemical substances within the high priority substances for risk management, a new classification established in 2020.  In addition, Fujifilm held online briefings for business partners and achieved 90% understanding of the chemSHERPA chemical information communication system, contributing to further improvement of management accuracy for hazardous substances used in products.

Digital print technology for a circular economy

This white paper has been published by Fujifilm as part of its commitment to deliver technically advanced and sustainable printing solutions for the print industry

Read the white paper

Reading time: 2 minutes

Where does print fit in the circular economy?

From books, newspapers, magazines and brochures to folders, annual reports and packaging, print remains a vital and highly effective branding, marketing and communications tool. But in an age of heightened environmental concern and ‘net zero’ carbon reduction targets, how can print be used in the most efficient and responsible way? In this white paper, we take a look at how the latest digital printing technology is dramatically cutting waste and making recycling much easier.

We must do more

As part of the “European Green Deal” project, there is an action plan for the EU to boost the efficient use of resources by moving to a clean, circular economy, restore biodiversity and cut pollution, and be climate neutral by 20501. To achieve this goal, action must be taken at all levels. Switching to renewable energy will, on its own, reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by only 55%. The remaining 45% of emissions come from the way we make and use products, which means working smarter and wasting less.

This certification program sets certain priorities to the certification criteria according to the product category and the use and features of each product through its entire life cycle. Fujifilm then clarifies the environmental value of each product by conducting environmentally conscious design assessments based on such certification criteria at the time of product development. Certain products are then selected for certification based on the total score of each assessment item. These products are reviewed and approved by the Group Certification Council, and finally certified as a Fujifilm “Green Value Product”.

The way we print is changing

The graphics industry has many analogue techniques which, especially when used for bespoke or short run work, have an enormous impact on the environment.

Now, thanks to the latest developments in digital print technology, there are machines which can print while also:

• Massively reducing raw material use
• Using fewer and more sustainable consumables
• Needing far fewer parts replacing
• Producing less waste
• Consuming less water
• Producing 100% recyclable printed products

This technology is moving print from the linear to the circular economy in which everyone has a role to play in keeping our planet liveable and our prosperity intact.

About Keypoint Intelligence

Keypoint Intelligence is recognised as the industry’s most trusted resource for unbiased information and analysis, and its awards are highly respected due to its impartiality and decades of experience in digital printing.

 

Fujifilm has recently increased its target for contributing to reducing CO2 emissions generated in society from 50 million tonnes to 90 million tonnes.  The aim is to achieve this by replacing conventional products with products that are more sustainable.

So far (2020) the progress is 20 million tonnes, 23% of the way towards the target

Product examples

In Fujifilm’s Graphic Arts business, the following products have been certified for their environmental performance:

Jet Press 750S High Speed Model:  GOLD

Effects on reduction of environmental impact:

  • Many of the consumables associated with conventional offset printing are eliminated
  • Significantly reduces the amount of wasted paper
  • Smaller footprint compared to previous models
  • The efficient drying mechanism reduces drying times, contributing to significantly higher speeds, and saving power
  • Excellent paper recycleability (de-inking ability)

Overall, there are significant reductions in resources, water use and waste compared to equivalent offset presses, with excellent paper recycling.

Revoria Press PC1120:                      SILVER

The requirements of major environment labels for energy consumption, hazardous substances, audible sound levels during operation and recyclable design are satisfied.

Revoria E1 Series:                             SILVER

The requirements of major environment labels for energy consumption, hazardous substances, audible sound levels during operation and recyclable design are satisfied.

Since 2013, we’ve significantly cut back on the waste produced at our ink factory, and last year (2021), 689.7 tonnes of waste produced on site went for recycling.

Craig Milsted | Sustainability Advisor, Fujifilm Speciality Ink Systems

Promote the recycling of resources

Reduce the amount of water the Fujifilm Group uses by 30% by FY2030 (compared to FY2013 levels)

The result in FY2020 was 16%, so the company is over half-way towards the goal of 30% by FY2030.

Contribute to the treatment of 35 million tonnes of water per year in society by FY2030

The result in FY2020 was 8 million tonnes, so the company is around 23% of the way towards the goal of 35 million tonnes by FY2030.

Reduce the amount of waste produced by the Fujifilm Group by 30% by FY2030 (compared to FY2013 levels)

Fujifilm has managed to ensure that the amount of waste produced by the Group did not increase in FY2020, despite rising revenues and an expansion of the business, but has not yet managed to make the reductions planned.  This is a key area of focus for the future.

Achieve a recycling index*3 of more than 10 by FY2030 (was 6.5 in FY2020)

Achieve a valuables conversion index*4 of more than 1 in FY2030 (was 0.63 in FY2020)

*3 Recycling index = (Recycled volume + Valuable-converted volume) / Simple disposal volume

*4 Valuables conversion index = Valuable-converted volume / Recycled volume

Impressive waste reduction

“But it’s not only energy consumption that we have been targeting.  Since 2013, we’ve significantly cut back on the waste produced at our ink factory, and last year (2021), 689.7 tonnes of waste produced on site went for recycling.

“Other initiatives include: 100% of our raw materials packaging is reused and recycled; we return 1000 litre IBCs for cleaning and reuse, rather than disposing of them; and a number of moulded components used as part of our ink pouches are made from recycled materials. Additionally, we now secure our pallets with straps rather than using shrink wrap, which reduces our waste by around 8 tonnes annually. We are also in the process of swapping plastic tape for paper tape.

“In R&D we have also achieved a 50% reduction in glass jar testing; a 38% reduction in end container testing for one litre bottles; a 74% reduction in end testing for five litre cubitainers; and we have cut back on the use of one, two and three litre pouches by 29%, 33% and 20% respectively. We are literally looking at every single part of our operation and making changes to reduce our environmental impact.

Smart cutbacks on solvents

“Overall, thanks to the printers we sell becoming more technologically advanced over the years, less ink is required during the printing process.  This is obviously a better and more sustainable situation in itself. However, you can’t print without ink – it’s the most crucial element of printing. So for the inks that we produce at our factory, previously we would typically use around 140,000 litres of oil-based solvents to clean the vessels used in our ink-making and mixing equipment.

“However, very recently we replaced our oil-based solvent cleaner with an 80% water-based (aqueous) cleaning solution, manufactured by a company called Safe Solvents. Coinciding with this, a first-of-its-kind pot washing machine, also supplied by Safe Solvents, was installed at the factory.

“Suitable for use with the new aqueous cleaning solution, the machine offers a significantly more efficient pot washing solution on our site. The aqueous cleaner and pot wash machine combo makes it possible for us to separate solvent and aqueous waste, and in the future, it could enable us to reuse the pots after they have been cleaned, and then when they are beyond reuse, have the clean plastic shredded and sent for further recycling.

Measuring and analysing is key

“The recently installed pot washing machine at Broadstairs is a world-first, so we look forward to reviewing our credentials in the future and seeing the difference it has made. The most important thing is that we continue to measure and analyse everything, as only by measuring can you improve.

“It really is a painstaking, but ultimately very rewarding process – we have achieved a great deal in the last 12 months with our renewed focus, but we are confident we can continue to make iterative improvements all over the site, across all areas of energy, waste and material reductions, to make this award-winning factory a world-class, sustainable one too.”

Digital print technology for a circular economy

This white paper has been published by Fujifilm as part of its commitment to deliver technically advanced and sustainable printing solutions for the print industry

Read the white paper

Reading time: 2 minutes

Where does print fit in the circular economy?

From books, newspapers, magazines and brochures to folders, annual reports and packaging, print remains a vital and highly effective branding, marketing and communications tool. But in an age of heightened environmental concern and ‘net zero’ carbon reduction targets, how can print be used in the most efficient and responsible way? In this white paper, we take a look at how the latest digital printing technology is dramatically cutting waste and making recycling much easier.

We must do more

As part of the “European Green Deal” project, there is an action plan for the EU to boost the efficient use of resources by moving to a clean, circular economy, restore biodiversity and cut pollution, and be climate neutral by 20501. To achieve this goal, action must be taken at all levels. Switching to renewable energy will, on its own, reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by only 55%. The remaining 45% of emissions come from the way we make and use products, which means working smarter and wasting less.

This certification program sets certain priorities to the certification criteria according to the product category and the use and features of each product through its entire life cycle. Fujifilm then clarifies the environmental value of each product by conducting environmentally conscious design assessments based on such certification criteria at the time of product development. Certain products are then selected for certification based on the total score of each assessment item. These products are reviewed and approved by the Group Certification Council, and finally certified as a Fujifilm “Green Value Product”.

The way we print is changing

The graphics industry has many analogue techniques which, especially when used for bespoke or short run work, have an enormous impact on the environment.

Now, thanks to the latest developments in digital print technology, there are machines which can print while also:

• Massively reducing raw material use
• Using fewer and more sustainable consumables
• Needing far fewer parts replacing
• Producing less waste
• Consuming less water
• Producing 100% recyclable printed products

This technology is moving print from the linear to the circular economy in which everyone has a role to play in keeping our planet liveable and our prosperity intact.

Fujifilm has recently increased its target for contributing to reducing CO2 emissions generated in society from 50 million tonnes to 90 million tonnes.  The aim is to achieve this by replacing conventional products with products that are more sustainable.

So far (2020) the progress is 20 million tonnes, 23% of the way towards the target

About Keypoint Intelligence

Keypoint Intelligence is recognised as the industry’s most trusted resource for unbiased information and analysis, and its awards are highly respected due to its impartiality and decades of experience in digital printing.

 

Product examples

In Fujifilm’s Graphic Arts business, the following products have been certified for their environmental performance:

Jet Press 750S High Speed Model:  GOLD

Effects on reduction of environmental impact:

  • Many of the consumables associated with conventional offset printing are eliminated
  • Significantly reduces the amount of wasted paper
  • Smaller footprint compared to previous models
  • The efficient drying mechanism reduces drying times, contributing to significantly higher speeds, and saving power
  • Excellent paper recycleability (de-inking ability)

Overall, there are significant reductions in resources, water use and waste compared to equivalent offset presses, with excellent paper recycling.

Revoria Press PC1120:                      SILVER

The requirements of major environment labels for energy consumption, hazardous substances, audible sound levels during operation and recyclable design are satisfied.

Revoria E1 Series:                             SILVER

The requirements of major environment labels for energy consumption, hazardous substances, audible sound levels during operation and recyclable design are satisfied.

Fujifilm is committed to fully integrating print into the circular economy. Net zero doesn’t have to mean online only – print will always have a vital role to play, and we’re committed to making sure it can always play that role efficiently, effectively and sustainably.

Promote the recycling of resources

Reduce the amount of water the Fujifilm Group uses by 30% by FY2030 (compared to FY2013 levels)

The result in FY2020 was 16%, so the company is over half-way towards the goal of 30% by FY2030.

Contribute to the treatment of 35 million tonnes of water per year in society by FY2030

The result in FY2020 was 8 million tonnes, so the company is around 23% of the way towards the goal of 35 million tonnes by FY2030.

Reduce the amount of waste produced by the Fujifilm Group by 30% by FY2030 (compared to FY2013 levels)

Fujifilm has managed to ensure that the amount of waste produced by the Group did not increase in FY2020, despite rising revenues and an expansion of the business, but has not yet managed to make the reductions planned.  This is a key area of focus for the future.

Achieve a recycling index*3 of more than 10 by FY2030 (was 6.5 in FY2020)

Achieve a valuables conversion index*4 of more than 1 in FY2030 (was 0.63 in FY2020)

*3 Recycling index = (Recycled volume + Valuable-converted volume) / Simple disposal volume

*4 Valuables conversion index = Valuable-converted volume / Recycled volume

Digital print technology for a circular economy

This white paper has been published by Fujifilm as part of its commitment to deliver technically advanced and sustainable printing solutions for the print industry

Read the white paper

Reading time: 2 minutes

Where does print fit in the circular economy?

From books, newspapers, magazines and brochures to folders, annual reports and packaging, print remains a vital and highly effective branding, marketing and communications tool. But in an age of heightened environmental concern and ‘net zero’ carbon reduction targets, how can print be used in the most efficient and responsible way? In this white paper, we take a look at how the latest digital printing technology is dramatically cutting waste and making recycling much easier.

This certification program sets certain priorities to the certification criteria according to the product category and the use and features of each product through its entire life cycle. Fujifilm then clarifies the environmental value of each product by conducting environmentally conscious design assessments based on such certification criteria at the time of product development. Certain products are then selected for certification based on the total score of each assessment item. These products are reviewed and approved by the Group Certification Council, and finally certified as a Fujifilm “Green Value Product”.

We must do more

As part of the “European Green Deal” project, there is an action plan for the EU to boost the efficient use of resources by moving to a clean, circular economy, restore biodiversity and cut pollution, and be climate neutral by 20501. To achieve this goal, action must be taken at all levels. Switching to renewable energy will, on its own, reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by only 55%. The remaining 45% of emissions come from the way we make and use products, which means working smarter and wasting less.

Fujifilm has recently increased its target for contributing to reducing CO2 emissions generated in society from 50 million tonnes to 90 million tonnes.  The aim is to achieve this by replacing conventional products with products that are more sustainable.

So far (2020) the progress is 20 million tonnes, 23% of the way towards the target

The way we print is changing

The graphics industry has many analogue techniques which, especially when used for bespoke or short run work, have an enormous impact on the environment.

Now, thanks to the latest developments in digital print technology, there are machines which can print while also:

• Massively reducing raw material use
• Using fewer and more sustainable consumables
• Needing far fewer parts replacing
• Producing less waste
• Consuming less water
• Producing 100% recyclable printed products

This technology is moving print from the linear to the circular economy in which everyone has a role to play in keeping our planet liveable and our prosperity intact.

Simple can be harder than complex. You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple.

Steve Jobs | Formerly Apple

Products which are developments to a design first conceived a decade ago sometimes need a complete rethink, in effect going ‘back to the drawing board’. But not at all in the sense that the old is completely discarded, more in the sense that everything is scrutinised and nothing stays as it is simply because ‘that’s the way it’s always been’.

With this project, we gave ourselves the freedom to go right back to first principles, and that led us to create something quite different to anything either we – or anyone else – had created before. This is the reason that when we first revealed the new machines in June 2021, we called them ‘the new blueprint for wide format’.

 

As with any product, the default is always to adapt what is there already, and products which have been tinkered with, tweaked and adapted over the years can often develop layers of complexity which are detrimental to performance, but we’re so used to them being there, it can be difficult to comprehend it being any other way.

Clever marketing? We’d like to think so, yes! But it’s a lot more than that. These products are designed to be a joy to work with; products designed for maximum productivity and versatility; products designed to be affordable. And that last point is important, the sleekest look and the highest level of performance is of no real value if it’s unaffordable to the people it’s designed for. A crucial part of good design in any commercial context is stripping out unnecessary costs while ensuring no compromise on what it needs to do well.

That was another critical part of the process we went through – we sought out the best component parts and the most suitable manufacturing partners to deliver on quality, performance and value. The end result, in our case, is a new range designed to redefine the price/performance ratio, deliver unrivalled levels of versatility and value and to boost ROI.

And we made sure they looked great too!

Learn more about the Acuity range

Discover more

Digital print technology for a circular economy

This white paper has been published by Fujifilm as part of its commitment to deliver technically advanced and sustainable printing solutions for the print industry

Read the white paper

Reading time: 2 minutes

Where does print fit in the circular economy?

From books, newspapers, magazines and brochures to folders, annual reports and packaging, print remains a vital and highly effective branding, marketing and communications tool. But in an age of heightened environmental concern and ‘net zero’ carbon reduction targets, how can print be used in the most efficient and responsible way? In this white paper, we take a look at how the latest digital printing technology is dramatically cutting waste and making recycling much easier.

This certification program sets certain priorities to the certification criteria according to the product category and the use and features of each product through its entire life cycle. Fujifilm then clarifies the environmental value of each product by conducting environmentally conscious design assessments based on such certification criteria at the time of product development. Certain products are then selected for certification based on the total score of each assessment item. These products are reviewed and approved by the Group Certification Council, and finally certified as a Fujifilm “Green Value Product”.

We must do more

As part of the “European Green Deal” project, there is an action plan for the EU to boost the efficient use of resources by moving to a clean, circular economy, restore biodiversity and cut pollution, and be climate neutral by 20501. To achieve this goal, action must be taken at all levels. Switching to renewable energy will, on its own, reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by only 55%. The remaining 45% of emissions come from the way we make and use products, which means working smarter and wasting less.

Fujifilm has recently increased its target for contributing to reducing CO2 emissions generated in society from 50 million tonnes to 90 million tonnes.  The aim is to achieve this by replacing conventional products with products that are more sustainable.

So far (2020) the progress is 20 million tonnes, 23% of the way towards the target

The way we print is changing

The graphics industry has many analogue techniques which, especially when used for bespoke or short run work, have an enormous impact on the environment.

Now, thanks to the latest developments in digital print technology, there are machines which can print while also:

• Massively reducing raw material use
• Using fewer and more sustainable consumables
• Needing far fewer parts replacing
• Producing less waste
• Consuming less water
• Producing 100% recyclable printed products

This technology is moving print from the linear to the circular economy in which everyone has a role to play in keeping our planet liveable and our prosperity intact.

With this project, we gave ourselves the freedom to go right back to first principles, and that led us to create something quite different to anything either we – or anyone else – had created before. This is the reason that when we first revealed the new machines in June 2021, we called them ‘the new blueprint for wide format’.

 

Products which are developments to a design first conceived a decade ago sometimes need a complete rethink, in effect going ‘back to the drawing board’. But not at all in the sense that the old is completely discarded, more in the sense that everything is scrutinised and nothing stays as it is simply because ‘that’s the way it’s always been’.

Clever marketing? We’d like to think so, yes! But it’s a lot more than that. These products are designed to be a joy to work with; products designed for maximum productivity and versatility; products designed to be affordable. And that last point is important, the sleekest look and the highest level of performance is of no real value if it’s unaffordable to the people it’s designed for. A crucial part of good design in any commercial context is stripping out unnecessary costs while ensuring no compromise on what it needs to do well.

That was another critical part of the process we went through – we sought out the best component parts and the most suitable manufacturing partners to deliver on quality, performance and value. The end result, in our case, is a new range designed to redefine the price/performance ratio, deliver unrivalled levels of versatility and value and to boost ROI.

And we made sure they looked great too!

Bringing it all together

Four design criteria emerged from the blueprint that informed all design choices and helped to identify the right manufacturers and suppliers to work with, as well as the OEM partners to help to bring it all together. These were: quality, value, performance and ease of use. In addition, every component part selected was chosen with these four criteria in mind, from the printheads to the user interface, lamps, static control and vacuum solutions. In all cases, Fujifilm made choices based on answering questions like: “does it do what it needs to do?” or “could it be done better?” Nothing was left unchanged that could be improved.

Three years on, the result of this blueprint is the all new Acuity range, designed and developed by Fujifilm. First and foremost, this new Acuity range has been designed to redefine the price / performance and ROI that can be expected from a UV inkjet system. This has been achieved through careful design choices, stripping back features that don’t add value, and maximising quality, value and performance where it matters most. The result is a high performance range available at a competitive price with low cost in use, a combination that radically changes print ROI.

The new Acuity range is also built for printers from the ground up, resetting expectations around operational ease of use. The ‘question everything’ approach to the whole process has allowed Fujifilm to put the operator experience front and centre. “We’ve taken on board the frustrations and inconveniences identified in our extensive market research, and addressed those concerns to create a range that is a real joy to work with and operate, with the additional benefit of maximising uptime and productivity,” says Kevin Jenner, European Marketing Manager, Fujifilm Wide format Inkjet Systems.

We’ve taken on board the frustrations and inconveniences identified in our extensive market research, and addressed those concerns to create a range that is a real joy to work with and operate, with the additional benefit of maximising uptime and productivity.

Kevin Jenner | European Marketing Manager

The first two printers made to this new blueprint are the Acuity Ultra R2 and the Acuity Prime. The Acuity Ultra R2 is a completely redesigned version of the Acuity Ultra, which itself had set a new standard for superwide print when it was launched in 2018. The Acuity Prime is an entirely new, mid-range flatbed which offers ease of use and print ROI unmatched by anything else on the market.

For more than 10 years since its initial launch, the Acuity range has built a reputation for quality, versatility and value and this new range will enhance the Acuity brand on all those fronts, while maintaining the reliability standards that have always been the hallmark of Fujifilm’s inkjet systems. And of course, the new printers take advantage of Fujifilm’s renowned UV inkjet ink.

Learn more about the Acuity range

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